ESET Threat Report

A view of the Q1 2020 threat landscape as seen by ESET telemetry and from the perspective of ESET threat detection and research experts. The first quarter of 2020 was, without a doubt, defined by the outbreak of COVID-19 – now a pandemic that has put much of the world under lockdown, disrupting people’s lives … More ESET Threat Report

A dive into Turla PowerShell usage

ESET researchers analyze new TTPs attributed to the Turla group that leverage PowerShell to run malware in-memory only. Turla, also known as Snake, is an infamous espionage group recognized for its complex malware. To confound detection, its operators recently started using PowerShell scripts that provide direct, in-memory loading and execution of malware executables and libraries. … More A dive into Turla PowerShell usage

Plead malware distributed via MitM attacks at router level, misusing ASUS WebStorage

ESET researchers have discovered that the attackers have been distributing the Plead malware via compromised routers and man-in-the-middle attacks against the legitimate ASUS WebStorage software. In July 2018 we discovered that the Plead backdoor was digitally signed by a code-signing certificate that was issued to D-Link Corporation. Recently we detected a new activity involving the same malware … More Plead malware distributed via MitM attacks at router level, misusing ASUS WebStorage

Turla LightNeuron: An email too far

ESET research uncovers Microsoft Exchange malware remotely controlled via steganographic PDF and JPG email attachments. Due to security improvements in operating systems, rootkit usage has been in constant decline for several years. As such, malware developers – especially those working in espionage groups – have been busy developing new stealthy userland malware. Recently, ESET researchers … More Turla LightNeuron: An email too far

Turla: In and out of its unique Outlook backdoor

The latest ESET research offers a rare glimpse into the mechanics of a particularly stealthy and resilient backdoor that the Turla cyberespionage group can fully control via PDF files attached to emails. ESET researchers have investigated a distinctive backdoor used by the notorious Advanced Persistent Threat (APT) group known as Turla (or Snake, or Uroburos) to siphon … More Turla: In and out of its unique Outlook backdoor