ESET takes part in global operation to disrupt Trickbot

Throughout its monitoring, ESET analyzed thousands of malicious samples every month to help this effort. ESET has collaborated with partners Microsoft, Lumen’s Black Lotus Labs, NTT Ltd. and others in an attempt to disrupt Trickbot botnets. ESET contributed to the project by providing technical analysis, statistical information, and known command and control server domain names … More ESET takes part in global operation to disrupt Trickbot

ESET researchers disrupt cryptomining botnet VictoryGate

ESET researchers have recently discovered a previously undocumented botnet named VictoryGate. It has been active since at least May 2019, and is composed mainly of devices in Peru, where over 90% of the infected devices are located. The main activity of the botnet is mining Monero cryptocurrency. The victims include organizations in both public and … More ESET researchers disrupt cryptomining botnet VictoryGate

Streaming service withstands 13‑day DDoS siege

The attack, unleashed by a 400,000-strong Mirai-style botnet, may be the largest of its kind on record. A botnet made up of 402,000 enslaved Internet-of-Things (IoT) devices has staged a 13-day distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack against an undisclosed streaming service, according to a blog post by cybersecurity firm Imperva. The company said it successfully counteracted the onslaught and the … More Streaming service withstands 13‑day DDoS siege

What is threat cumulativity and what does it mean for digital security?

A reflection on how acknowledging the cumulative nature of cyber-threats and understanding its implications can benefit our digital security. Threat cumulativity is a term I began to use in 2018 to refer to the tendency of new technologies to spawn new threats that add to old threats without displacing them. In this article I give … More What is threat cumulativity and what does it mean for digital security?

Could home appliances knock down power grids?

Far-fetched though it may sound, the answer is yes, according to researchers, who show that electrical grids and smart home appliances could make for a dangerous mix. Cybercriminals could rope internet-connected household appliances into a botnet in order to manipulate the demand side of the power grid and, ultimately, cause anything from local outages to large-scale blackouts, … More Could home appliances knock down power grids?